This is Second Presbyterian Church in St. Louis, MO.  Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge designed the chapel, built in 1896.  In 1900, the main church was completed, designed by Theodore Link.  What would Trinity Church look like all in white stone?
Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge
After HHR's death, George Foster Shepley, Charles Hercules Rutan, and Charles Allerton Coolidge, who worked in Richardson's office, inherited the firm and completed nearly all of the projects in the office at the time of his death. Commissions continued to come into the office for "Richardson" buildings. 
This picture was taken from the steps of the Ames Memorial Hall in N. Easton, MA.  The building is Richardsonian Romanesque, but not by Richardson. Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge designed it.  Originally a post office and bank, each on one side of  the building, it is now offices.
MS Encarta 99 (which came with my new pc) shows this building in it's section on Richardson rather than the more famous Trinity Church or Allegheny County Courthouse.  It is identified as being designed by HHR.  IT WAS NOT.  It is too balanced to be a Richardson building. Richardson was a master of asymmetrical massing.
This is Second Presbyterian Church in St. Louis, MO.  Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge designed the chapel, built in 1896.  In 1900, the main church was completed, designed by Theodore Link.  What would Trinity Church look like all in white stone?
This building, also in St. Louis, is a slightly larger, but more elaborate version of Richardson's Hayden Building in what is now Boston's Chinatown.  Built in 1888, just two years after Richardson's death, it was originally a Bell Telephone Company building.
This is Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge ten years after the building above.  In one of St. Louis' most exclusive areas, Portland Place, local architect John L. Mauran assisted.  Even in this much shadowed picture, you can easily see that it is not a Richardsonian building.  Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge struggled to find their own identity after Richardson's death.  They moved away from Romanesque and toward styles made popular by McKim, Mead & White.