The Kimball Mansion, across the street, was designed by Solon S. Beman.  The large arch at the right side of the left photo (above) is actually the servant's entrance.  A narrow hallway runs along that wall.  The rooms face the courtyard, as seen at right.  If you arrived by carriage you went down a sloping porte cochere (at the left front of the house).  You would actually enter the house slightly below street level and then climb a short flight of stairs to enter the main house.  A small alcove above the entryway was reserved for musicians.  The house remains largely intact because of the Glessners.  Originally willed to the American Institute of Architects, the Glessner House Museum (the entity who inherited the property from the Chicago Architectural Foundation and who now manage the property on behalf of the City of Chicago) has recently completed a major restoration of the exterior.  The brick of the interior courtyard is no longer black and the roof has been restored to it's original orange color.  For more information about the house click here:  Glessner House Museum.
One of Richardson's last projects (completed after his death in 1886) is also one of his greatest.  It's the J.J. Glessner House (1885-1887) in Chicago.  Glessner founded the company that became International Harvester & knew of Richardson through Richardson's famous, but since demolished, Marshall Field Wholesale Store, also in Chicago.  Glessner bought a corner lot on the newly fashionable S. Prairie Avenue and commissioned HHR to build his house.  The Glessners became infatuated with Richardson.  They even had him recreate his own study in the Glessner's house. When finished, the house had some detractors.  A neighbor was heard to complain that he didn't like living across from a prison.  Only a few of the grand mansions of S. Prairie Ave. remain.  Chicago's oldest existing house, the
Clark House
, an 1836 Greek Revival, is nearby and can be toured as part of a package with the Glessner House. 
Richardson didn't only design buildings.  He designed furniture.  He drew a plan for, but never built, an ice house for the Ames'.  He designed several monuments (click
HERE
to see the Bache and Pruyn Monuments).  At left is the Bagley Memorial Fountain (1885-1887) in Detroit.  The fountain is a hardy survivor.  It's surrounded by empty lots and newer high rise buildings.
Richardson didn't only design buildings.  He designed furniture.  He drew a plan for, but never built, an ice house for the Ames'.  He designed several monuments (click
HERE
to see the Bache and Pruyn Monuments).  At left is the Bagley Memorial Fountain (1885-1887) in Detroit.  The fountain is a hardy survivor.  It's surrounded by empty lots and newer high rise buildings.
Richardson designed several train stations.  The one below is the former Boston & Albany Station (1883-1885) in S. Framingham, MA.  It's still used as a stop on the commuter rail into Boston, but the building itself now houses a restaurant.  Union Station in New London is still in use as a station, but now includes office space.  One small station in Wellesley Hills, MA is a "T" stop, but the building is a dry cleaning store.  The Woodland station in Newton is used as a shed for the greens keepers at the country club.  The Green Line of the MBTA still goes past, but it doesn't stop.  A station in Holyoke, MA is now an auto parts wholesale store.  The large station in Palmer, MA houses an antique store/flea market.  The trains still go by here, too, but no one gets off except train personnel checking track switching.  This is a good spot for trainspotters.  They set up their cameras, usually facing the station, to catch trains coming from the west.
This is Union Station (1885-1887) in New London.  Notice the similarity to Sever Hall?
One of Richardson's last projects (completed after his death in 1886) is also one of his greatest.  It's the J.J. Glessner House (1885-1887) in Chicago.  Glessner founded the company that became International Harvester & knew of Richardson through Richardson's famous, but since demolished, Marshall Field Wholesale Store, also in Chicago.  Glessner bought a corner lot on the newly fashionable S. Prairie Avenue and commissioned HHR to build his house.  The Glessners became infatuated with Richardson.  They even had him recreate his own study in the Glessner's house. When finished, the house had some detractors.  A neighbor was heard to complain that he didn't like living across from a prison.  Only a few of the grand mansions of S. Prairie Ave. remain.  Chicago's oldest existing house, the
Clark House
, an 1836 Greek Revival, is nearby and can be toured as part of a package with the Glessner House. 
The Kimball Mansion, across the street, was designed by Solon S. Beman.  The large arch at the right side of the left photo (above) is actually the servant's entrance.  A narrow hallway runs along that wall.  The rooms face the courtyard, as seen at right.  If you arrived by carriage you went down a sloping porte cochere (at the left front of the house).  You would actually enter the house slightly below street level and then climb a short flight of stairs to enter the main house.  A small alcove above the entryway was reserved for musicians.  The house remains largely intact because of the Glessners.  Originally willed to the American Institute of Architects, the Glessner House Museum (the entity who inherited the property from the Chicago Architectural Foundation and who now manage the property on behalf of the City of Chicago) has recently completed a major restoration of the exterior.  The brick of the interior courtyard is no longer black and the roof has been restored to it's original orange color.  For more information about the house click here:  Glessner House Museum.